Monday, June 02, 2008

The Drone Bay: Episode 11 - Better Late than Never











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EVE Forum Link (please bump!)

Show notes:

Episode 11 emerges from the tubes! What dark secrets does it proclaim

Bring on the Drones:

In the weekly recap the guys go over all the new and exciting EVE podcasts. A podcast for every day of the week at last! Also, it turns out that Crovan is a care-bear at heart. Who knew?

In DON'T PANIC the experts chime in on PvP. Up for discussion: once you know what you are going to do, when and where do you get to do it? What are the rules of engagement, and when can you blow up someone who looks at you funny?

In the listener feedback section, we find out about how not to get a key logger in one easy step! There is follow up and clarification for the DON'T PANIC on roles in PvP. Our listeners express concern for Crovan's safety in Japan, and CK hears back from EVE Uni about the lockdown during a war dec.

Cry Havoc and let slip the Drakes of war! Our intrepid hosts tackle the Empyrean age. What is in store for the EVE universe, and what do we need to be thinking about as we approach this new era in EVE. Also, we all engage in some author worship in regards to the upcoming book.

This show gets a louder music bed, because the song is just that cool! Also, this was the first editing job done by Alsedrech, which explains a lot about any editing problems. If you are in Tokyo, email Crovan immediately so he can find you as he travels the Japanese countryside.


Contact Info:

GAX Online Group: The Drone Bay

E-Mail:
dronebay[at]gmail.com (comments/questions for everyone)
crovan[at]eve-mail.net
crazykinux[at]gmail.com
alsedrech[at]gmail.com

Skype: Dronebay

Blogs:
Bitter Old Noob (Crovan)
CrazyKinux's Musing
The Littlest Drone (Alsedrech)

5 comments:

Shalkis said...

A few pointers about WoW mods: The overwhelming majority of WoW mods are written using LUA, a simple programming language that's run inside WoW in a sandbox. That severely limits what the mod can and cannot do. For example, the sandbox itself is started only after you've logged in, selected your character and entered your server. That makes is practically impossible for the mod to steal your password, because the password isn't even in memory at that point.

However, nothing prevents malicious mod authors into including normal binary code within their mods and telling the user to run it. Also, most mods are distributed within standard .zip or .rar archives, but malicious mod authors could use a self-extracting .zip (or .rar) and embed the malicious code into the extractor code.

The playerbase of the WoW is such a big target, so even these methods that seem silly to a knowledgeable user do work. Trojans and other malicious software are not unlike spam in this regard. Even if only a tiny fraction of the player base gets fooled, it's still tens of thousands of players.

Gary said...

I wanted to say that "Adagio For Strings" by Mozart is one of my favorite songs of all time. It is so amazing in it's ability to create an aura of peace.

Unfortunately that song nearly put me to sleep during this Episode.

It's a great song, but I'm not sure it's something you want people listening to in the background. Another bad background song would be Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata".

Just something you should look for in future podcasts.

This is still one of my favorite podcasts, keep up the great work.

CrazyKinux said...

Thanks for your comments guys!

As for the bed track, Adagio for Strings, it is an amazing piece, one of my favourite and the theme to Homeworld's intro scene if you remember. It is though, not from Mozart, but from Samuel Barber, an American composer. It was composed in 1936 and was voted the best classical piece of the 20th century.

Were always experimenting with different bed track and will have something different for episode #12.

Thanks again Gary for your comments.

CK

Gary said...

I wonder why I thought it was Mozart?

CrazyKinux said...

I was totally taken by surprise myself when I read about the piece on Wikipedia. Blew me away that it was a contemporary composition. Guess great classical music still gets compose today.